HIT STRIDE

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As the locally-celebrated objects dropped from the sky to mark the start of 2018, our plans to improve ourselves took effect. Whatever ideas or aspirations you've committed to, I hope they're now habit-formed.

In all honesty, it took me all of January to identify exactly what and where I needed to improve. 

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In sport, monitoring pace helps identify rhythm, build strength, and gauge efficiency. Marathoners. Long-jumpers. Thoroughbreds. Frisbee dogs. All are fixed on keeping, setting - or in some cases - pushing pace.

Leaders of all disciplines are likewise fixated on pace. A delivery service wouldn't survive long if it didn't track and monitor its repeatable operations - they're dependent upon rhythm, coordination, and unification. Introducing distractions or variables disturbs that sequence of events, and building back that momentum - if you still have any - is arduous.

Protect your pace (don't sabotage it).

Set the pace, or step up the pace. Identify your best processes and protect them. 

 Forgive my second reference to horse racing in the same email (we  are  only a few miles from Churchill Downs).

Forgive my second reference to horse racing in the same email
(we are only a few miles from Churchill Downs).

Unheralded figures in the world of horse racing are arguably the trainers and riders known as 'pony people'. Their essential tasks: training partners to horses during early morning workouts (pacing); guides for their paired horse before and after a race; and general calming presence to the horse when distractions erupt all around them (especially in big races). 

Build up your support team.

In terms of keeping pace, staying connected, and validating direction, be sure to surround yourself with honest voices who can contribute to your efforts. When you're preparing for a big event or campaign, your team is in lock step with what you're planning because they were there at the outset. They might even keep you calm simply with their presence...

It should look A LOT like this...

  I totally stole this image from a first grader's diorama.    It was that good, and it fit my theme.  This doesn't even look like Kentucky.

I totally stole this image from a first grader's diorama. 
It was that good, and it fit my theme.
This doesn't even look like Kentucky.

Continue your pace. Recognize strides and protect the methods you used to reach them. Shoot me an note if you need a calming (and creative) presence.

Kevin McCarron